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5                              Everyday Conversational Expressions                                           Directing a Conversation p.5

 

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* 5 Directing a Conversation (p.5 of 8)

 

5.20   When you stress that your point is clear

 

It’s as clear as day.   Listen   <“Obviously, Marta is not interested in Jeremy. It’s as clear as day.”>

It’s as plain as day.   Listen   <“I explained how it works to you. It’s as plain as day.”>

A child can understand it.   Listen   <“I still don’t understand how you came to this conclusion.” – “Let me explain again. A child can understand it.”>

Any fool can see it.   Listen   <“We’re going to lose this game. Our team is much weaker than our opponents. Any fool can see it.”>

Don’t you know it?   Listen   A “I am surprised that you don’t know such a common thing.”   <“You work too much. You need some rest.” – “A husband’s duty is to take care of his wife. Don’t you know it?”>

Don’t you see it?   Listen   A “I am surprised that you don’t understand such an obvious thing.”   <“Why are you running? I can hardly follow you.” – “We can be late for our flight. Don’t you see it?”>

Listen to Entire Passage

 

 

5.21   When you want a person to pay attention

 

Listen carefully.   Listen   <“Listen carefully. I won’t repeat twice.”>

Listen to me.   Listen   <“Listen to me. It’s important.”>

Open your ears.   Listen   <“Open your ears. I want to tell you something.”>

Keep your ears open.   Listen   <“This conversation is very important. Keep your ears open.”>

Pick up your ears!   Listen   <“Pick up your ears! Don’t miss a word.”>

Get the wax out of your ears.   Listen   <“Get the wax out of your ears. Be very attentive.”>

Listen to Entire Passage

 

 

5.22   When you are misunderstood by a person

 

You’ve got me wrong.   Listen   A “You have misunderstood what I said.”   <“You’ve got me wrong. I said no such thing.”>

You’ve got it all wrong.   Listen   < “You’ve got it all wrong. Listen to what I’m telling you.”>

You’ve got it wrong.   Listen   <“You’ve got it wrong. That’s not what I said.”>

You’ve twisted my words.   Listen   A “You have interpreted my words inaccurately.”   <“I didn’t mean that. You’ve twisted my words.”>

You’ve missed the point.   Listen   A “You have misunderstood the most important part of my thought.”   <“I’m not saying I don’t want to go out tonight. I’m saying I have a lot of work to do tonight. You’ve missed the point.”>

You’re only hearing what you want to hear.   Listen   <“I didn’t say that. You’re only hearing what you want to hear.”>

You’re not listening to what I’m saying.   Listen   <“I didn’t say George is a bad husband. You’re not listening to what I’m saying. I said George has some bad habits.”>

You’re putting words into my mouth.   Listen   A “You are misrepresenting what I am saying.”   <“I’ve never suggested you should move. You’re putting words into my mouth. I’ve always said you are welcome here, but at the same time you are free to go whenever you like.”>

You’re quoting me out of context.   Listen   A “You are taking just a few words out of the surrounding context therefore misrepresenting what I am really saying.”   <“You’re quoting me out of context. Stop putting words in my mouth.”>

You’re taking it out of context.   Listen   <“I’m not saying you need to retire. You’re taking it out of context. I’m just reminding you that at your age you need to work less.”>

You’re blowing it out of proportion.   Listen   A “You are exaggerating the importance of what happened.”   <“I know you had an argument with your husband.” – “Dad, you’re blowing it out of proportion. It was just a friendly discussion. Contentious, though.”>

You’re blowing this all out of proportion.   Listen   <“We are not discussing divorce. It’s just a rumor. You’re blowing this all out of proportion.”>

Listen to Entire Passage

 

 

5.23   When your point is misunderstood

 

I didn’t mean to give you that impression.   Listen   <“You’ve got it all wrong. I didn’t mean to give you that impression. Let me explain.”>

I didn’t mean to imply that.   Listen   <“You’ve got me wrong. I didn’t mean to imply that. Let me repeat myself.>

I didn’t mean that.   Listen   <“Excuse me if my words offended you. I didn’t mean that.”>

That’s not what I meant.   Listen   <“You’ve got it wrong. That’s not what I meant. Let me clarify where I am standing on this question.”>

I said no such thing.   Listen   <“I said no such thing. You’re putting words into my mouth. Let me reiterate my statement.”>

That’s not what I said.   Listen   <“That’s not what I said. You’re quoting me out of context. My position is different from your interpretation.”>

I didn’t say that.   Listen   <“I didn’t say that. You’re putting words into my mouth. Let me make myself perfectly clear.”>

That’s not my point.   Listen   <“Your sister works hard and yet she doesn’t make enough money.” – “That’s not my point. My sister’s real problem is that she isn’t frugal with her money.”>

That’s not the point I’m trying to make.   Listen   <“I agree with you. The government could allocate funds better.” – “That’s not the point I’m trying to make. What I’m saying is the government just doesn’t need to spend so much.”>

You just don’t get it!   Listen   A “You just don’t understand what I am trying to tell you.”   <“I explained the complexity of our economic situation to you a few times. You just don’t get it!”>

Listen to Entire Passage

 

 

5.24   When your point was not heard or noticed

 

It went in one ear and out the other.   Listen   A “Information was immediately forgotten.”   <“I told my colleague an important thing to do. It went in one ear and out the other.”>

There’s none so deaf as those who will not hear.   Listen   <“I tried to teach my sister frugality, but there’s none so deaf as those who will not hear.”>

There’s none so blind as those who will not see.   Listen   <The teacher told the parents that little Lilly steals money from other children. Naturally, they refused to believe it. There’s none so blind as those who will not see.>

My plea fell on deaf ears.   Listen   A “My request was ignored.”   <“I suggested that my friend Henry should get a job. My plea fell on deaf ears.”>

They turned a deaf ear to my plea.   Listen   <“Unfortunately, the board of directors rejected my proposal. They turned a deaf ear to my plea.”>

They turned a blind eye to my appeal.   Listen   <“I filed several applications with the bank trying to get a low-interest loan. They turned a blind eye to my appeal.”>

Listen to Entire Passage

 

 

5.25   When a person has suddenly understood your point

 

You got it!   Listen   A “Finally, you understood it!”   <“So, if I don’t go to college, I won’t get a good job, will I?” – “You got it!”>

 

 

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