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2                                                              Everyday Conversational Expressions                                           Parting p.1

 

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* 2 Parting (p.1 of 2)

 

2.1   When you bid farewell to a person

 

Good-bye.   Listen   <“Good-bye, Bob.” – “See you soon, Nancy. Don’t do anything I wouldn’t do.”>

Bye.   Listen   <“See you later, Tom.” – “Take care, Tiffany. Bye.”>

Bye-bye.   Listen   <“Bye, Jerry. Say hello to your sister.” – “I will. Bye-bye.”>

Good-bye until later.   Listen   A “Good-bye until we meet in the future.”   <“Take care, Mary. Bye.” – “Good-bye until later, Bob.”>

Good-bye until next time.   Listen   A “Good-bye until we meet next time.”   <The newscaster said, “Our program is over now. Good-bye until next time.”>

Good-bye for now.   Listen   A “This meeting is over, so good-bye until next time.”   <The bell rang, and the teacher said, “Children, good-bye for now. See you tomorrow.”>

I’ll talk to you soon.   Listen   A “Good-bye until I talk to you again soon.”   <“It was nice talking to you, Jane. I’ll call you in a few days.” – “Good-bye, Greg. I’ll talk to you soon.”>

I’ll be seeing you.   Listen   A “Good-bye until some future time.”   <“Good-bye for now. I’m off to Mexico for a short vacation.” – “Have a nice time. I’ll be seeing you.”>

See you.   Listen   A “Good-bye until I see you again.”   <“Take care, Bill.” – “See you, John.”>

See you around.   Listen   A “Good-bye until I see you again somewhere.”   <“Next time I will be in Los Angeles in May.” – “OK. See you around.”>

See you later.   Listen   A “Good-bye until I see you again sometime.”   <“See you later, alligator.” – ”After a while, crocodile.”>

See you soon.   Listen   A “Good-bye until I see you again soon.”   <“Bye-bye, we’ll be back in a couple of days.” – “See you soon.”>

See you real soon.   Listen   <“I’m calling you from the airport. I’ll be home tonight.” – “Good. See you real soon.”>

See you in a little while.   Listen   A “Good-bye for some short period of time.”   <“It’s two o’clock now. Get dressed for tonight. I’ll pick you up at seven.” – “OK. See you in a little while.”>

See you next time.   Listen   A “Good-bye until I see you next time.”   <“It was nice seeing you, Mary.” – “Good-bye, Bob. See you next time.”>

See you tomorrow.   Listen   A “Good-bye until I see you tomorrow.”   <“Johnson, don’t stay at work too long. See you tomorrow.” – “Good night, boss.”>

See you then.   Listen   A “I’ll see you at the time we agreed upon.”   <“I’ll arrive in Los Angeles at 7p.m.” – “Alright. See you then.”>

So long.   Listen   <“So long”, said William as he left the living room.>

Farewell.   Listen   A “Go well.”   <“Farewell, my love”, said the countess to the chevalier in the movie.>

I bid you a farewell.   Listen   <She cried, “I bid you a farewell forever.”>

Cheerio.   Listen   <“Good-bye, George.” – “Cheerio, Henry.”>

Be good.   Listen   <“Well, I’m off. I’ll be back in a few days.” – “Bye. Be good.”>

Don’t be gone too long.   Listen   A “Hurry back home.”   <“I’ve got to go to a hardware store to get some tools.” – “Don’t be gone too long.” – “I’ll be right back”.>

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2.2   When you bid farewell to a person at a particular time of the day

 

Good day.   Listen   A “I wish you a good day.”   <“Good day, Mr. Johnson.” – “Take care, Mary.”>

Have a nice day.   Listen   <“I like your store.” – “Thank you, sir, and have a nice day.” – “See you.”>

You have a good day.   Listen   <“I’m grateful to you for your help.” – “Any time. You have a good day.” – “Bye.”>

Good afternoon.   Listen   <“See you later, Jim.” – “Good afternoon, Sue.”>

Good evening.   Listen   <“It’s been a long day, boss. Good evening.” – “See you tomorrow, Bill.”>

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2.3   When you part with a person for the night

 

Good night.   Listen   <“Good night, Lucy.” – “Good night, Bob”>

See you in the morning.   Listen   <“Good night, Cathy.” – “See you in the morning, James.”>

Sweet dreams.   Listen   <“See you in the morning, Pete.” – “Sweet dreams, Betty.”>

Sleep well.   Listen   <“Sweet dreams, Ed.” – “Sleep well, Molly.”>

Sleep tight, don’t let the bedbugs bite.   Listen   <My father used to tell me when I was a little boy, “Sleep tight, don’t let the bedbugs bite.”>

(Chiefly to a child) Night-night.   Listen   <The mother kissed her child and said, “Night-night”.>

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2.4   When you are about to take leave of a person

 

It was good to see you.   Listen   A “I am glad I saw you this time.”   <“Good-bye, Henry. It was good to see you.” – “Bye, Margaret. See you around.”>

It was nice to see you.   Listen   <“Good-bye, Jim. It was nice to see you.” – “Bye, Harriet. Take care.” – “You too.”>

Nice to see you.   Listen   < –“It was nice to see you too.”>

I hope to see you again sometime.   Listen   <“Good-bye, George.” – “Bye, Sally. I hope to see you again sometime.” – “You will.”>

It’s been good talking to you.   Listen   < – “Good talking to you too.”>

It’s been good to talk to you.   Listen   <– “Nice talking to you too.”>

It’s been nice talking to you.   Listen   < – “Nice talking to you too.”>

Nice talking to you.   Listen   < – “Nice talking to you too.”>

Take care.   Listen   A “Good-bye and keep yourself well.”   < – “Okay. Good-bye.”>

Take care of yourself.   Listen   A “Good-bye and take good care of your health.”   < – “You too. Bye.”>

All the best to you.   Listen   A “I wish you all the best.”   <“Good-bye, Nancy. All the best to you.” – “Thanks. You take care of yourself.”>

All the best to your brother.   Listen   A “Please convey my best wishes to this person.”   <“Bye, Alice. All the best to your mother.” – “Thank you. See you, Tom.”>

Give my best to your sister.   Listen   <“Good-bye, Harry.” – “See you, Sue. Give my best to your family.”>

Say hello to your cousin for me.   Listen   A “Convey my greetings to this person.”   <“Good-bye, Jeremy. Say hello to your uncle for me.” – “Sure. Bye, Willie.”>

Remember me to your friends.   Listen   A “Don’t forget to pass my greetings to this person.”   <“Good-bye, Jerry. Remember me to your friends.” – “I will, Harriet. Bye.”>

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